Offshore multi-purpose platforms for a Blue Growth: A technological, environmental and socio-economic review.

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Abstract: 

“Blue Growth” and “Blue Economy” is defined by the World Bank as: “the sustainable use of ocean resources for economic growth, improved livelihoods and jobs, while preserving the health of ocean ecosystem”. Multi-purpose platforms (MPPs) can be defined as offshore platforms serving the needs of multiple offshore industries (energy and aquaculture), aim at exploiting the synergies and managing the tensions arising when closely co-locating systems from these industries.

Despite a number of previous projects aimed at assessing, from a multidisciplinary point of view, the feasibility of multipurpose platforms, it is here shown that the state-of-the-art has focused mainly on single-purpose devices, and adopting a single discipline (either economic, or social, or technological, or environmental) approach. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to provide a multidisciplinary state of the art review on, whenever possible, multi-purpose platforms, complementing it with single-purpose and/or single discipline literature reviews when not possible. Synoptic tables are provided, giving an overview of the multi-purpose platform concepts investigated, the numerical approaches adopted, and a comprehensive snapshot classifying the references discussed by industry (offshore renewables, aquaculture, both) and by aspect (technological, environmental, socio-economic). The majority of the multi-purpose platform concepts proposed are integrating only multiple offshore renewable energy devices (e.g. hybrid wind-wave), with only few integrating also aquaculture systems. MPPs have significant potential in economizing CAPEX and operational costs for the offshore energy and aquaculture industry by means of concerted spatial planning and sharing of infrastructure.

Year: 
2020
Application in MSP: 
Unknown effect
Sectors: 
Aquaculture
Offshore renewable energy production
Type of Issue: 
Coexistence of uses
Economic aspects
Environment aspects
Social aspects
Type of practice: 
Study
Stage of MSP cycle: 
Analyse spatial aspects
Coherence with other processes: 
Integrated Coastal Zone Management

Questions this practice may help answer:

What lessons can be learned from the multidisciplinary analyses of multi-purpose platforms (MPPs)?

Implementation Context:

The study was undertaken in cooperation between the academic and research institutions of the UK and China.

Aspects / Objectives:

The aim of the study is to provide a multidisciplinary state of the art review on, whenever possible, multi-purpose platforms, complementing it with single-purpose and/or single discipline literature reviews when not possible.

Method:

Synoptic tables are provided, giving an overview of the multi-purpose platform concepts investigated, the numerical approaches adopted, and a comprehensive snapshot classifying the references discussed by industry (offshore renewables, aquaculture, both) and by aspect (technological, environmental, socio-economic). 

Main Outputs / Results:

The study provides a review of technological, environmental, and socio-economic analyses of ORE devices and aquaculture systems. 

Transferability:

The methodology applied can be useful for the feasibility assessments of multipurpose platform projects.

Responsible Entity:

Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.

Costs / Funding Source:

The project was funded by the NERC Science, EPSRC, GCRF  and NSFC.

Contact person:

Maurizio Collu: maurizio.collu@strath.ac.uk

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