A “Learning paradox” in Maritime Spatial Planning.

-----

Please note:

The Commission is in the process of updating some of the content on this website in light of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union. If the site contains content that does not yet reflect the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, it is unintentional and will be addressed.

-----

MARITIME STUDIES 

Abstract: 

Both policy-makers and scholars acknowledge and emphasize the need for learning in maritime spatial planning (MSP). However, few explain why learning is important. As such, it remains a vague and understudied process and is taken for granted and assumed to be and do “only good” which might hinder an in-depth assessment of the effectiveness of learning in policymaking. In this paper, we investigate whether, and if so in what way, explicit attention is given to learning in MSP. In this way, we try to unpack a (plausible) “learning paradox” and gain more insight into the different conceptualizations of learning in MSP. We use seven dimensions to examine learning in MSP by conducting a literature review of scientific MSP literature and a case study, which analyzes learning in the Dutch MSP process. The literature review and case study point to a “learning paradox” in MSP, showing both similarities and differences. The common lack of attention for risk and ambiguities is particularly problematic, while the existing clarity about who (should) learn and how can be seen as opportunities to gain insights in learning in MSP. Overall, we argue that acknowledging the paradox is paramount to improve the effectiveness of learning processes in MSP.

Sea Basin(s): 
Country: 
Year: 
March 2020
Application in MSP: 
Unknown effect
Sectors: 
Not sector specific
Type of Issue: 
Stakeholders
Type of practice: 
Study
Stage of MSP cycle: 
Vision and aims
Cross-border / trans-national aspect: 
No
Coherence with other processes: 
Integrated Coastal Zone Management

Questions this practice may help answer: 

  • Why learning is important in MSP?
  • Do the academics and policy-makers give an explicit attention to learning in MSP and, if so, in what way? 

Implementation Context: 

The study is conducted as part of the PhD thesis by Xander Keijser on the use of Serious Game in Marine Spatial Planning, Wageningen University, The Netherlands.

Aspects / Objectives: 

The objectives of the study are:

  • To investigate whether (and if so in what way) attention is given to learning in MSP;
  • To unpack a “learning paradox” and provide more insight into the different conceptualizations of learning in MSP; 
  • To examine learning in MSP.

Method: 

The authors use seven dimensions to examine learning in MSP by conducting a review of scientific MSP literature and a case study, which analyzes learning in the Dutch MSP process.

Main Outputs / Results: 

The minor explicit attention to learning reveals the existence of a learning paradox in MSP. Acknowledging the paradox is paramount to improve the effectiveness of learning processes in MSP. 

Transferability: 

The methodology applied can be used in MSP processes in any region.

Responsible Entity: 

Environmental Policy Group, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 

Centre for Blue Governance, Aalborg University, Denmark 

Funding Source: 

Environmental Policy Group, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 

Centre for Blue Governance, Aalborg University, Denmark 

Xander Keijser's thesis has also been supported by the Rijkswaterstaat (Netherlands) 

Contact person: 

Xander Keijser: xander.keijser@wur.n 

Hilde Toonen: hilde.toonen@wur.nl 

Jan van Tatenhove: tatenhove@plan.aau.dk 

Share

Print