Transnational MSP Stakeholder Dialogue

Abstract: 

In order to stimulate a dialogue on MSP at pan-Baltic level between sectors and planners, stakeholder workshops were organised in the scope of the PartiSEApate project. Through a series of nine single sector workshops stakeholders gained an understanding of what MSP is and why it is important to treat certain topics on a transnational level and planners in turn received an insight into sectors’ priorities, objectives, expectations, hopes and fears.

Sea Basin(s): 
Year: 
2013
Application in MSP: 
Unknown effect
Sectors: 
Aquaculture
Fishery
Offshore renewable energy production
Ports
Shipping
Type of Issue: 
Coexistence of uses
Data
Economic aspects
Ecosystem-based approach
Environment aspects
Land-sea interactions
Resilience to climate change
Safety aspects
Sea-basin cooperation
Social aspects
Stakeholders
Type of practice: 
Methodology
Stage of MSP cycle: 
Analyse spatial aspects
Cross-border / trans-national aspect: 
Yes

Questions this practice may help answer

  • What are issues / topics of stakeholder groups’ that have to be considered in transnational MSP
  • What is the relation of each sector to other sectors in terms of conflicts and synergies?
  • Which other stakeholders do sectors wish to consult and on what?

Implementation context

In order to stimulate a dialogue on MSP at pan-Baltic level between sectors and planners, stakeholder workshops were organised in the scope of the PartiSEApate project. Through a series of nine single sector workshops stakeholders gained an understanding of what MSP is and why it is important to treat certain topics on a transnational level and planners in turn received an insight into sectors’ priorities, objectives, expectations, hopes and fears.

In a cross-sectoral workshop horizontal interaction between sea use sectors (nature protection/environment, fisheries, offshore wind, shipping/ports) about synergies and conflicts within the framework of MSP development was initiated

Aspects / Objectives

The main objectives of the workshops were to

  • Introduce MSP principles and expectations to MSP envisaged in the BaltSeaPlan vision 2030,
  • Identify and evaluate sectoral priorities and objectives with regard to MSP,
  • Identify topics for consultation at transnational level,
  • Review expectations and potential concerns with regard to MSP,
  • Identify the specific nature of conflicts and synergies with other sectors,
  • Explore the range of MSP tools potentially available for sea use solutions.

Method

The workshops were conducted and evaluated with a harmonized methodology.

As a starting point, all PartiSEApate project partners identified sectors and stakeholders (and contact persons) that should be invited to participate in a pan-Baltic MSP dialogue. Apart from transnational organisations, the list was also open to include national or even regional stakeholders, but only where it was anticipated that they may have an interest and the capacity to participate and contribute to a pan-Baltic process.

The set-up of the workshop was rather informal inviting participatns to express personal opinions rather than necessarily reflecting the official opinion of the organisation or country represented. To encourage attendance, workshops were spread around different Baltic Sea Region countries. They took place in easily accessible locations and were sometimes organised back-to-back with other workshops. To offer an added incentive, travel costs for some participants were reimbursed. Presentations and the ensuing workshop discussions were documented and sent to all participants for comment before being published on the PartiSEApate website.

The problem of representativeness in these relatively small and limited workshops was offset by other methods of data gathering, including individual semi-structured telephone interviews specifically targeting those unable to attend. In addition to the guided discussion, participants were asked to fill in a standardised questionnaire at the end of each workshop. This questionnaire contained questions on the professional background of participants, importance ratings of goals related to good maritime management, conflicts and synergies at sea between different sectors and past and future involvement of participants in MSP dialogue.

In addition, workshops were followed up by a series of semi-structured telephone interviews carried out in February and March 2014. Interviews took one hour on average and centered on the same topics as discussed in the workshops, with the organisation of a pan-Baltic MSP dialogue as an added aspect. This included discussion of expectations of a pan-Baltic MSP dialogue perceived barriers to a pan-Baltic MSP dialogue, forms and structures such a dialogue should ideally take, and the role of existing pan-Baltic organisations in organising such a dialogue. Interviewees included representatives of national and international sectoral organisations (such as national and international industry associations, research institutes, NGOs), as well as representatives from national ministries and competent authorities for MSP.

Main Outputs / Results

Opportunities and challenges for MSP stakeholder dialogue

 

Issues / topics to consider in MSP per sector / relevant area

Sector needs for dialogue

Transferability

The approach for initiating stakeholder dialogue at sea-basin level can be transferred to other contexts.

Contact Person

Angela Schultz-Zehden

s.pro – sustainable projects GmbH

Email: asz@sustainable-projects.eu

Phone: +49 (0) 30 – 832 1714 40

 

Anda Ruskule

Baltic Environmental Forum Latvia

Email: bef@bef.lv

Phone: +371 6735 7551

Responsible Entities

s.pro – sustainable projects GmbH

Baltic Environmental Forum Latvia

Costs / Funding Sources

The PartiSEApate project was financed by the Baltic Sea Region Programme.

 

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